We’ve been collaborating recently with a friend, John Baker, Safety and Security Manager for Lancaster Lebanon IU13 in Pennsylvania. John requested I draft a guest blog post last week, and it just went live here.

You can also read the post here:
——-

With foresight and leadership, great schools across the country are making safety a priority, and not just with words but concrete action. Here are some notable items to consider when putting your own plan into action:

  • Not Just Active Shooter – Ironically, the best way to prepare for an active shooter incident is to embrace safety solutions that can be used for more common safety incidents. The high incidence of active shooter events is frightening, and many schools have changed their mindset to “when,” not “if.” That said, every school frequently faces incidents such as accidents, injuries, weather events, fights and other dangerous situations involving students, parents, or visitors. By communicating through a system like Punch Alert on a regular basis, a school is able to more finely tune its ability to handle, measure, and improve its response for when it needs it the most.
  • Work Together – Safety is not just the job of our law enforcement. In the past, schools relied too much on 911 and the police or fire department to arrive on scene and direct traffic. This approach has not proven sufficient. Schools must act immediately and with confidence. Punch Alert customers form an “internal responder” team for every location that makes emergency response their greatest responsibility. Within seconds of an emergency declared, responders communicate in the mobile app and make the critical decisions whether or not to release the emergency not only to official responder groups, but staff, faculty, students, parents, or even visitors. With this inclusive approach, schools are able to build a community of safety that can work together to make a difference.

At Punch Alert, we’ve been very lucky to work with and learn from great, action-oriented schools across the country. As a parent of young children, I’m optimistic that our schools have the skills, tools, and mindset required to keep our children safe. But this will not happen on its own. We all need to get involved and help our schools move beyond the talk and take action!